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Arts / Entertainment

28th Annual Pow Wow Oct. 30

October 29, 2010

Several Native American tribes will gather on Saturday, Oct. 30 in the Main Ballroom of the Lory Student Center for the 28th Annual Pow Wow. Prepare to be moved by the sight of colorfully dressed dancers and the full-bodied sounds of drums and singers. A free Pow Wow feed takes place at 5 p.m.

The Northern Cree Singers and the Southern Outlawz are the Northern and Southern hosts for the 28th Annual Pow Wow.

Saturday, Oct. 30
10:30 a.m.-10 p.m.
Lory Student Center
Main Ballroom

Traditional costumes, dancing, food

The annual CSU pow-wow is a wonderful opportunity for those who have never attended a pow-wow to see what they're all about.

The term pow-wow comes from a Narragansett word, "Pawwaw," which means "spiritual leader."

The pow-wow is an event that honors Native American culture and heritage through its traditional dance regalia, dancing, singing, and food.  There will be fun games and prizes for everyone.

CSU will hold its 28th annual pow-wow on Saturday, Oct. 30 from 10:30 a.m.to 10 p.m. in the Lory Student Center  Main Ballroom. The event is open to everyone and free. There are door prizes for CSU students (must present ID). 

Northern Cree & Southern Outlawz

The Grammy-nominated Northern Cree Singers from Alberta, Canada is the Host Northern Drum group (they just earned their fifth Grammy nomination) and the Southern Outlawz from Hogback, New Mexico, is the Host Southern Drum group.

Pow-wow 101

If you want to know more about pow-wows, come to Pow-Wow 101, being held on Thursday, Oct. 28 at 5 p.m. in the Lory Student Center, Room 220. Randy Medicine Bear, the arena director for CSU's pow-wow, will present on the basics of what a pow-wow is all about. The presentation will range from the different styles of dancing, singing, to the traditional aspect of Pow-wow.

A crew of volunteers prepares beef stew for the Pow Wow Feed.

The presentation is sponsored by the American Indian Science & Engineering Society at CSU. 

Hosts/schedule

  • Northern Host - Northern Cree Singers, Saddle Lake, Alberta
  • Southern Host - Southern Outlawz, Hogback, NM
  • Emcee - TBA
  • Arena Director - Randy Medicine Bear
  • Spiritual Advisor - Lee Plenty Wolf
  • Head Man - AC Nobraid
  • Head Woman - AJ Nobraid
  • Honor Guard - Colorado State University Student Veterans
  • Gourd Dancing - 10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
  • Grand Entries - 1 p.m. and 7 p.m.
  • Pow Wow Feed - 5 p.m.

Native American traditional food — frybread and Indian tacos, will be on sale during the Pow Wow. 

Origins of the Gourd Dance

The Gourd Dance is a type of Native American celebration dance and ceremony. It is believed that the dance originated with the Kiowa tribe. Gourd dances are often held to coincide with a pow-wow, although the Gourd Dance has its own unique dance and history.

Gourd Dancing may precede the pow-wow, or it can be a separate event, not directly connected with a pow-wow.


Contact: Delbert Willie
E-mail: dwillie@engr.colostate.edu