Today @ Colorado State has been replaced by SOURCE. This site exists as an archive of Today @ Colorado State stories between January 1, 2009 and September 8, 2014.

Programs

Help around the Oval

October 20, 2010
By Rommel McClaney

Organizers of Cans Around the Oval seek to collect more than 90,000 pounds of food this year.

Caleb, a little boy who brought cans in his stroller with his mom, helps a CSU student load cans after being weighed into a box.

An important tradition

The Oval is a place which embodies the rich history and tradition at CSU. Perhaps the most important tradition that takes place there is Cans Around the Oval.

A tradition since 1987, Cans Around the Oval is the largest one-day food drive in Northern Colorado. CSU partners with the Food Bank of Larimer County to raise food and monetary donations to help those in need in the community.

This year, more than 140 university and community groups have signed up to participate.

New organization donates

Senior construction management major Josh Hieb pulled up to the distribution center at the Oval with plenty of boxes of cans filling the back of his truck, ready to donate.

The total weight of the cans came out to an impressive 170 lbs. But Josh didn't collect these all by himself.

Students and other volunteers help President Tony Frank stack a truck load of rice donated to Cans Around the Oval.

"I'm with a new organization on campus called the National Society of Leadership and Success, or NSLS. We went around the neighborhood close to where we live in and passed out bags, letting them know about the cause. A week later we went back around and collected the cans from them."

Members also donated a fair share of cans. The NSLS has about 250 members and tries to impose positive change in student's lives through goals, networking, and any other aspects of their lives they want to see positive change in.

"We could've collected a little bit more (cans) but I'm happy with what we have. From what I see around the Oval, a lot of cans have been collected and it's good to see."

Hieb is very confident the NSLS will bring in many more cans next year.

Making a difference

Many students volunteer for Can Distribution day but many people from around the community help as well. Elizabeth MacQuestin and Kelly Cromer were responsible for weighing and organizing cans at a weight station near the Administration building.

Students form the College of Business wait to have their cans weighed.

MacQuestin and Cromer are from Weston Distance Learning, one of the largest distance-learning education institutions in the nation. Weston Distance Learning services three distance education schools: At-Home Professions, U.S. Career Institute, and McKinley College.

"Our company is participating in the Make A Difference Day and they had different organizations we could apply at," said Cromer. "We chose this one because collecting food for those who don't have it is great!"

Both agree it is great their work compinsates and allows them to take time off of work by to come down and volunteer.

"A friend of mine actually utilizes the food bank (here in Fort Collins). It's good for me to donate my time towards something that closely affects me," said MacQuestin.

Business picks up

Traffic around the Oval picked up at about noon when many fraternities, sororities and campus organizations began delivering their collections.

The College of Business brought in a trailor filled with pallets of cans from each of the different departments.

Donation trucks had already made several full load trips by 1 p.m. and organizers also expected another rush later in the day while waiting for more residence halls to donate.