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Administration

CSU System Board approves budget, tuition and fees

May 3, 2013

The Board of Governors of the Colorado State University System voted to accept budget and tuition proposals submitted by the system's three campuses for the fiscal year beginning July 1.

The FY2014 operating budgets for each unit are as follows:

  • CSU in Fort Collins -- $957.1 million, compared to $911.4 for FY2013
  • CSU-Pueblo -- $45.3 million, compared to $44.8 million for FY2013
  • CSU-Global Campus -- $52.6 million, compared to $41.1 million for FY2013
  • CSU System Office -- $5.2 million, compared to $5.5 million for FY2013

“The budgets for campuses within the CSU System reflect each institution’s singular focus on access and success for all students,” Chancellor Mike Martin said. “Resident tuition at CSU in Fort Collins remains well below that of other peer research universities, and tuition and fees are unchanged at CSU-Pueblo and CSU-Global. With a clear commitment to administrative efficiency, all three institutions offer high quality and tremendous value for Colorado students and their families.”

Resident undergraduate tuition at CSU in Fort Collins will be $7,494 in FY2014, a $619 increase over the previous year. That is below proposed in-state tuition rates at peer institutions such as Michigan State, UC-Davis, Purdue, Washington State, Virginia Tech and the University of Illinois. For a Colorado comparison, resident undergraduate tuition at CU-Boulder for FY2014 will be $8,760.

Resident undergraduate tuition at CSU-Pueblo remains unchanged at $4,894 for next year, and the per-credit-hour undergraduate tuition rate at CSU-Global Campus will continue to be $449.

Student fees at CSU in Fort Collins will be $1,729 next year, up 2.6 percent or $22.75 from the previous year. Student fees will remain unchanged at CSU-Pueblo at $1,466. These fees are approved by the student governments of each campus to help fund a range of specific services, such as, student recreation, the student health network, and facilities. CSU-Global Campus does not charge student fees.

After several years of deep cuts in state funding, this year’s CSU System budget is the first since 2009 that includes additional money from the Colorado General Assembly, which increased spending on higher education by about $30 million for the 2014 fiscal year. This will mean approximately $6.1 million in additional state revenue for the CSU System.

“This year’s budget is good news for students and our employees, because – after several very difficult years – we’re going to be able to make investments in academic programs, financial aid, student support initiatives, campus safety and more,” said Tony Frank, president of CSU in Fort Collins. “We’re even going to be able to give our faculty and staff a raise, which we weren’t able to provide for several years during the economic downturn.

Frank added: “Certainly, we’re thankful that the state is able to invest some new resources into higher education this year, but it’s important that Coloradans view our budget and tuition rates within the context of the historical state funding situation. Even with this increase, our budget is still well below what it was just a few years ago because of deep cuts in state funding during the recession.”

In 2009-10, the state put $706 million into the public higher education system. With an increase of $30 million this year, the total state budget for all of higher education will be about $543 million, a net decrease of $163 million. At CSU in Fort Collins, state funding dropped $36.5 million – 28 percent – between July 2010 and June 2012.

Also, over the years the burden of paying for higher education has shifted from state government to students and families. Twenty years ago, the state paid two-thirds of the cost of educating a resident student; today, in inflation-adjusted dollars, the state pays only one-third. That trend toward defunding higher education in Colorado has accelerated in recent years and is the biggest driver of tuition increases at CSU.

“Thanks to efficiencies achieved during years of cuts, we will be directing the additional state funds into new programs and initiatives – not refilling holes,” Martin said. “The CSU System is coming out of these difficult times stronger and more productive than ever, with a resolute commitment providing three exceptional universities to Colorado residents at an exceptional value.”

CSU System

The Board of Governors of the CSU System has nine voting members, appointed by the governor and confirmed by the State Senate, and six non-voting members who are faculty and student representatives from CSU, CSU-Pueblo and the CSU-Global Campus. The board provides oversight to ensure effective management, accountability and leadership at all the CSU System universities – Fort Collins, Pueblo and the online Global Campus.