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Working at CSU

Feeling unmotivated? Review this checklist to re-stoke your fire

June 15, 2009

Even cheerleaders lose their enthusiasm from time to time. If you're feeling sluggish and unmotivated, reviewing this checklist may help you reignite your spark:

Purpose
Why are you here?

Sometimes people get so caught up in daily responsibilities that they lose sight of the Big Picture. Remind yourself why you chose this field, this organization, this role.

Expectations
Are your goals realistic or do you expect too much of yourself?
 
It’s hard to muster a lot of enthusiasm when you’re so overwhelmed that you barely have time to breathe. Reconsider your priorities and look for ways to cut your workload.

Connection
Do you see a gap between what you do every day and where you want to be in your career?

Try connecting the dots. You’ll be more committed to your tasks if you can view them as steps in the right direction.

Assistance

Are you in over your head?

Don’t be afraid to ask for help from mentors, bosses, colleagues, and employees. If you stubbornly insist on taking responsibility for more than you can handle, you’ll wind up burning out.

Distractions
Are you struggling with personal issues?

Simmering personal problems can drain attention and energy from your work life. Consider taking time off or seeking professional help to resolve your issues.

Scheduling
Do you allow yourself enough time to focus on each of your duties?
 
Poor scheduling can leave you frazzled and frantic. Rework your schedule to ensure you set realistic deadlines.

Negativity
Are you your worst enemy?

If you spend a lot of time beating up on yourself for your perceived inadequacies, you’re undermining your own motivation and progress. Stop obsessing about perfection and start recognizing - and rewarding - your own accomplishments.


-Adapted from “10 tips for motivation,” from the George Washington University Counseling Center